M. Sc. Electrical Engineering
European Patent Attorney

With a blue-collar background in the car industry, after graduating from Chalmer’s University of Technology (Gothenburg, Sweden) Magnus started to work as a patent examiner at the Swedish Patent Office in Stockholm, where he stayed from 1991 to 1994 (including a short period at the Swedish Court of Patent Appeals).

In 1994 he moved to private practice and to Madrid (Spain), where he has been living ever since. Before co-founding BALDER in 2012, Magnus worked for four of the most important Spanish IP firms, at one of which he directed the foreign patent department. In all of his previous positions, Magnus mainly dealt with prosecution before foreign patent offices, with a special focus on the European Patent Office (EPO). He was also involved with different one-stop shopping programs for Latin America.

Magnus was one of the very first professionals in Spain to become a European Patent Attorney by passing the European Qualifying Examination (EQE). This, in combination with his language skills (although his working languages are only English, Spanish and Swedish, Magnus also understands German and French, the two other official languages of the EPO), is one of the reasons for why Magnus has become one of the favorite patent professionals for IP conscious Spanish companies in the electro-mechanical field.

And not only for those wishing to obtain quality patents, but also for those desiring to have their competitors’ patents revoked. Magnus started early to handle oppositions before the EPO and its Boards of Appeal, and has by now acquired a unique experience and an excellent track record.

Magnus deals with a wide range of technologies in the electro-mechanical field, including renewable energies, industrial machinery, and automobile components.

Apart from his work related to the filing and prosecution of patent applications and oppositions, Magnus is frequently involved with litigation, advising clients and acting as an expert before Spanish Courts, providing opinions on infringement and validity. Magnus has also successfully completed the CEIPI (Centre d’Études Internationales de la Propriété Intellectuelle, Strasbourg, France) diploma course in European patent litigation.

Magnus also participates actively in external and internal tutoring programs for the next generation of European Patent Attorneys. He has co-authored the Spanish chapter of the book Patent Claim Interpretation (Thomson/West; editions 2008-2011).

When not working, Magnus enjoys hiking, walking his dogs, working out at the gym, dancing tango, cooking and eating (one good reason to live in Madrid), good wines, and having the odd gin-tonic (another good reason to live in Madrid). Magnus recommends putting half a slice of red or pink grapefruit at the bottom of the glass, a little bit of sugar on top of it, crush, fill the glass with ice, add 10 cl of Xoriguer® gin and mix with 20 cl of Fever-Tree® tonic water. And add another half a slice of grapefruit. Enjoy this complimentary piece of advice from BALDER!

Magnus says:

“I remember from working in Sweden that there was a general awareness of the Peter Principle (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Peter_Principle), that is, that if you are not careful with your organisation, people will tend to get promoted until they reach their level of incompetence; or what may be even worse: they will dedicate all their efforts on reaching their level of incompetence! In the first companies for which I worked in Spain, I soon found out that there were basically two ways to get well paid: belonging to the right family (preferably, the owner’s family) or reaching a manager position. After discarding the first option, I managed to become a manager, just to realize that I had reached my level of incompetence: the company lost a fairly brilliant patent attorney and got a mediocre director of a department.

And this is not only my personal problem. The way I see it, most local IP firms fail to offer skilled patent attorneys attractive conditions unless they become managers. Thus, talented people with ambition generally tend to strive hard towards the manager positions. Which, as Dr. Peter alerted decades ago, may not be good at all for the organisation!

So when starting up the BALDER project, I wanted to make sure to avoid this trap. In BALDER, every professional who works hard and makes a real contribution to the business knows that there is no limit: she or he knows that within a reasonable time span, she or he can become not only a partner, but a partner with the same vote and the same participation in profits as the founding partners. And this by doing what she or he is good at doing! Brilliant attorneys shall make brilliant attorney work products, and be co-ordinated by brilliant managers. I think that this will be the key to our success: talented and motivated people, organised for optimised results.”